Projects

Lambeth Palace Library

Lambeth Palace Library

TREE CONSTRAINTS PRE-PLANNING ADVICE/ARBORICULTURAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT/ARBORICULTURAL METHOD STATEMENT INFORMING CONSTRUCTION/SITE MONITORING
Client: The Church Commissionsers

Lambeth Palace Library contains an unrivalled collection of precious books and manuscripts that have contributed to the ecclesiastical and cultural life of the Church and the nation for centuries. The new library situated within the grounds of the palace is to become a landmark public building in Lambeth and will increase the accessibility of this world class collection, one of the first public libraries in England. Commissioning the new library on such a sensitive site presented a great opportunity to create a building of exemplary green standards, both in its construction and future operation.

Working with an award-winning multi-disciplinary design team. Landmark Trees provided specialist arboricultural advice during the planning process and have been retained to monitor works throughout construction for overall tree protection. As part of the ongoing management strategy of the garden, plans had already been made for the removal of a small number of mature chestnut trees which have unfortunately become irreparably damaged by Bleeding Canker. Those trees have been removed during the construction of the library, allowing the palace to implement a planned programme of long-term tree management. Wherever possible, any trees removed will be recycled, with timber used to create furniture and sculpture for the Palace as well as being used as compost and wood chippings for the gardens. Completion is due in 2020.

The King's Observatory

The King's Observatory

TREE CONSTRAINTS PRE-PLANNING ADVICE/ARBORICULTURAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT/ARBORICULTURAL METHOD STATEMENT
Client: Kew Holdings Ltd

The King’s Observatory and its surrounding parkland are situated within the London Borough of Richmond. The observatory was constructed in 1767 by King George III, with the parkland designed in the style of the famous landscape architect, Capability Brown, in 1769. Plans for the restoration of the Observatory and its landscape setting were commissioned when Kew Holding took back the head lease, with Landmark Trees instructed to undertake a survey of the existing tree resource in 2010. Initial ideas explored the possibilities of replacing the confusion of surrounding buildings and structures with a pair of formalised, surface wings on either side of the Grade I building. This approach was gradually rejected as too intrusive into the landscape and disruptive of the simple purity of Chambers’ building. The design then evolved to replace all the modern building underground and restore the Observatory to its Arcadian setting on a grassy mound. The proposals that received planning permission in 2014 are for the partial demolition, change of use to C3 residential, the subterranean extension of the building and landscape restoration works, including substantial new tree planting.

65-67 Bishops Avenue, Buxmead

65-67 Bishops Avenue, Buxmead

TREE CONSTRAINTS PRE-PLANNING ADVICE/ARBORICULTURAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT/ARBORICULTURAL METHOD STATEMENT/10 YEAR ARBORICULTURAL & LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT PLAN
Client: Harrison Varma Services Ltd

Landmark Trees have been retained by Harrison Varma since 2007  for all their development projects (proposals and construction)  in and around The Bishops Avenue. For this relatively large wooded site, situated in a Conservation Area, with Tree Preservation Orders affecting various trees in and around the site, Landmark Trees have played an important role within the multi-disciplinary team. The work from the outset (site purchase) included identifying planning constraints, informing the design process, liaising with two London Boroughs and local stakeholders, negotiating solutions and agreeing long-term (S106) management strategies, as well as providing the client with practical expertise and technical support during the construction process. A 25 year landscape management plan was produced in support of the planning permission. This document sets out the arrangements for the maintenance of the combined tree resource (the Bishops Wood) and new landscaping  to complement the proposed renovation of the existing dwelling and the new high-quality apartment development.

The Grove Hotel

The Grove Hotel

TREE CONSTRAINTS PRE-PLANNING ADVICE/ARBORICULTURAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT/ARBORICULTURAL METHOD STATEMENT/ MANAGEMENT OF THE TREE RESOURCE
Client: The Grove Hotel

The Grove is a luxury five-star hotel, set in 300 acres of Hertfordshire countryside, 18 miles from central London. The former home of the Earls of Clarendon is now a championship golf resort and award-winning spa, has three restaurants and a walled garden with urban beach. The Estate is enclosed by woodland to the south and north, and hedgerows to the east and west. Landmark Trees have been retained by the Grove Hotel as arboricultural specialists to advise on the tree constraints affecting the expansion and modernisation of the hotel, and on the management of the existing tree resource around the property. The key aspects of this project include:

• On-going management/protection of the retained tree resource: the Hotel has to respond to an evolving requirement for a high quality experience for the exclusive cliental, requiring the adaptation and extension of the existing buildings and other built resources. Landmark Trees provide on-going advice to enable the hotel to meet the requirements for development within the significant arboricultural constraints.

• Pre-application advice: early identification of the tree constraints likely to affect proposed developments to allow operational enhancement. Design modifications and mitigation to reduce impacts prior to any planning submission.

Eton College

Eton College

Since 2009, Landmark Trees have been helping Eton College design and implement a risk management strategy for its extensive school grounds and wider rural estate. Including the sports fields, there are 1000 trees in the immediate grounds alone, with the numbers running into the tens of thousands for the total estate. A diverse network of thoroughfares from the High Street and Half Mile Track to the River Thames itself runs beneath the crowns of large, mature trees.

Before even undertaking the surveys, we worked with the college to identify the higher-risk areas within the site for priority surveying. Only then were the first 1000 trees surveyed to record relevant qualitative data in order to assess their condition and the extent of risk liability. Survey type varied by area usage from general walkover studies to individual tree inspections, and where indicated, further investigation with diagnostic equipment (PICUS sonic tomogram or Resistograph microdrill). These powerful tools allow us to look further ‘inside’ the tree, guided by our initial visual assessment. For a short, but helpful demonstration, please see the video.

Providing the college with a quantified tree risk assessment (a composite ranking of target area, size of significant part and risk of failure) has allowed the estates management team to initiate a defensible strategy, prioritising tasks according to ranking, and so discharge its liability to students and members of the public. The college now has two fully trained inspectors in its grounds staff to monitor the continuing health of trees, using the inventories created, in dialogue with our own consultants. The result has been a move away from a reactive service to informed resource management, working together to make the best use of in-house capability and external consultancy.